How to Avoid the Most Common Back to School Illnesses

Back-to-school can be a busy time, not just for parents and students, but for illnesses as well. The close quarters of a school environment become a breeding ground for germs, all while seasonal allergens are in full swing. What can parents do to prepare their children before school begins? We've put together a quick guide to help parents make back-to-school season a little healthier.

A Month-by-Month Guide to Seasonal Allergies in Richmond, Virginia

We often think of spring as "allergy season." But if you're an allergy sufferer, every season can seem like allergy season. What steps can you take to keep your allergies from becoming an irritation all year round?

Why See an ENT Doctor to Treat My Allergies?

Those suffering from allergies must overcome the daily challenges they cause. Whether patients know the specific allergens to avoid or not, one of the most important questions they seek an answer to is who should they turn to for help.

Is Sublingual Immunotherapy Right for Me?

Sublingual (under the tongue) immunotherapy is a treatment for allergic rhinitis. It works by boosting a patient's tolerance to specific allergens thereby decreasing allergy symptoms, rather than simply suppressing symptoms. Here's what you need to know to determine if sublingual immunotherapy is right for you.

Do I Qualify for Balloon Sinuplasty?

Traditional sinus surgical procedures require cutting, via a microscopic drill, into the sinuses to remove sinus bone and tissue. A balloon sinuplasty is a procedure that takes the theory of “less is more” to heart. It does not involve cutting, can be done as an in-office procedure, and requires far less recovery time. But is it right for you? Let’s take a look at what balloon sinuplasty is and what indications it has.

Reasons Children’s Adenoids Are Removed

Adenoids are a lymphoid tissue that lies at the back of the nose at the top of the throat, behind the soft palate. Like any other lymphatic tissue, they respond to infection. When people have viral infections, adenoids and tonsils (made of the same type of tissue) enlarge to fight the infection.

As a child grows, their adenoids also grow. The adenoids reach peak size between the ages of 5-7. As the child gets older, the adenoids atrophy, or waste away, as the body finds other ways to fight the infection. By the teenage years, adenoids are usually very small, if not undetectable.